SANTA BARBARA, Calif. -

There may be some real time research surfacing about the growing shark population off the Southern California coast.

Chris Fischer with Ocearch, has been tracking sharks on both coasts to get the latest information about their patterns and where they give birth.

He says some of the local waters are showing signs of young sharks because more are born here now that fishing rules have changed.  Fischer says the survival rate is much higher.

Speaking recently with CBS This Morning he said the population is "exploding because we had success in the '90's.  We banned the capturing of sharks in '97. We got some of the in shore gill nets out, and now 20 years later we have some success.  A lot more juvenile sharks in Southern California which is a white shark nursery," said Fischer.

At Santa Barbara's Hendry's beach, Lisa Sullivan from Memphis said she once lived in Northern California and near beaches known for sharks. She has seen the recent reports of shark attacks including one off Los Angeles County but also thinks there's been a social media explosion that's led to the widespread release of shark photos.

"It's definitely social media.  It happens. When I grew up it was not unusual to hear of a shark attacks,  but not every day," said Sullivan.

One local resident said she would not put her toe in the water because of a fear of sharks.

"I think there are definitely more sharks definitely, yes," said Claire Haig.

When there are credible sightings on local beaches, signs are posted to warn swimmers and tell them to go into the water at their own risk.