Politics

Gun shop owners see increase in sales after Las Vegas shooting

Bump stock devices stir contoversy

Gun shop owner shares his thoughts...

SANTA BARBARA, Calif. - The Las Vegas shooting that killed dozens and injured hundreds of country music fans at a festival in Las Vegas on Sunday night has led to talk about gun control and an increase in gun sales.

Dodge City in Santa Barbara has been busy.

Shop owner Rick Dodge said, "Yesterday, I had a bunch of sales just because people are afraid, okay, here they are going to come again."

Dodge said people expect the legislature to take gun rights away from Good Samaritans because of the mass shooting by a single man.

He said it would be easier to understand if it was ISIS.

Dodge City does not sell the bump stocks used by the shooter to increase the rate of fire, but that doesn't mean the owner of the shop wants them banned.

"Once they ban this, they want to ban something else, they don't stop," said Dodge.

Politicians are talking about guns, too. Rep. Salud Carbajal is opposed to the legalization of silencers already being considered by Congress.
 
The Democrat from Santa Barbara said he would also like to see a ban on bump stocks.

"It is deeply disturbing that semi-automatic firearms can easily be turned into a fully automatic weapon, shooting between 400 and 800 rounds per minute, by purchasing bump fire stocks for less than $200," said Carbajal.

"In the Marine Corps Reserve I trained with automatic firearms, these weapons of war have no place in our communities. No single measure will solve the epidemic of mass shootings in America, but that is not an excuse for inaction. Congress must pursue a ban on bump fire stocks and close this egregious loophole. After the deadliest shooting in American history, which was made even more lethal with the use of bump fire stocks, this is the least we can do," said Carbajal.

Dodge said he understands how some people are feeling, but he still wants the government to uphold the Second Amendment which states; "A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed."

The debate is likely to continue as gun sales and stocks rise in the United States.


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