New pest poison rules proposed by EPA

Animal Rescue Team in Santa Ynez says over the counter poisons are a risk to larger animals

John Palminteri, KEYT - KCOY - KKFX Senior Reporter, johnp1250@aol.com
POSTED: 06:46 PM PST Jan 30, 2013    UPDATED: 08:43 AM PST Jan 31, 2013 
SANTA YNEZ VALLEY, Calif. -

The Environmental Protection Agency is proposing strict rules on the sale of pest control poison, because of risks to children and pets.

The EPA says it hopes to reduce thousands of accidental exposures to children and pets.

The Animal Rescue Team in the Santa Ynez Valley says  in has about a dozen birds and one bobcat that died of suspicious circumstances this month.  It's possible the animals ate a rodent or mouse that first consumed one of the controversial poisons.  "And then the bobcats become sick and thin and develop mange and eventually sucombs to it because the organs start to fail," said Julia DiSieno with the Animal Rescue Team.

Wednesday she was sending off the dead birds and the bobcat to a special lab with the State Department of Fish and Wildlife.  Experts with U.C. Davis are also participating in the study.  The results of the investigation will determine if the poisons the EPA wants to ban, were involved.

DiSieno says residents should not feed their animals outdoors because that attracts the pests and brings the problems to their property.  She also says wood piles should be removed.   If possible, it's suggested that you add owl boxes to your property and that will bring in birds of prey to do the rodent control for you.

The EPA targeted a handful of companies tow years ago, saying they needed to develop new, safer products.  All but Reckitt Benckiser, the manufacturer of d-CON, did so.  The company has 30 days to appeal the latest decision or the ban will take effect.